Wyoming News Update

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VETERANS ASHES-INTERNMENT

CASPER, Wyo. (AP) — A coalition of nonprofit groups plans to inter the ashes of 23 military veterans in a Wyoming cemetery.

The Casper Star-Tribune reports the ashes are scheduled to be interred Sept. 18 at the Oregon Trail State Veterans Cemetery in Evansville.

The public ceremony 3 miles (5 kilometers) east of Casper is expected to include military honors for the unclaimed, created remains of Sheridan County veterans.

The planned internment is a combined effort of groups including the Wyoming State Society Daughters of 1812, Kane Funeral Home of Sheridan, the Natrona County United Veterans Council, and the Missing in America Project.

The Missing in America Veterans Recovery Program is a federally recognized organization for the identification, location, verification, and movement of the remains of veterans and family members.

TRAILER STOLEN-FOSSILS

AURORA, Colo. (AP) — A trailer containing fossils worth more than $100,000 has been reported stolen from a Colorado parking lot.

KCNC-TV reports the sliver-toned trailer was taken Sunday from the Crowne Plaza Convention Center and Hotel lot in Aurora.

Officials say the 20-foot-long (6.1 meter) trailer contains 13 fossils including at least four valued at more than $10,000 each.

Officials say the items belonging to fossil and mineral supply company GeoDecor Inc. include a 92-million-year-old fossil shark specimen valued at $50,000.

The fossilized skull of a giant predatory fish from Kansas is valued at $20,000, while a fossil garfish is valued at $18,000.

A stingray and fish fossilized in limestone from Wyoming is believed to be 51 million years old.

Details of the stolen items have been circulated to fossil dealers.

GRAND TETON-GLACIERS

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho (AP) — Officials at Grand Teton National Park in northwestern Wyoming are trying to determine if some of the park's 11 glaciers are still moving or if they are now remnant glaciers or ice patches.

The Post Register reports in a story on Saturday that the park is making an effort to better understand Teton, Middle Teton, Schoolroom, Petersen and Falling Ice glaciers.

National park glaciologist Simeon Caskey says it will take about a decade to gather enough information to see how the park's glaciers fit in with climate change models.

Scientists are using GPS readings from the surface of the glaciers, time-lapse photos and stakes to examine the glaciers.

Experts say the park's glaciers formed during the Little Ice Age from about 600 to 150 years ago.

MISSING FISHERMAN

CASPER, Wyo. (AP) — Divers are searching for a man who fell from a boat while fishing in a reservoir southwest of Casper.

The Natrona County sheriff's office says the call came in at 7 p.m. Saturday from the Fremont Canyon area of Alcova Reservoir.

Crews are in the water and using sonar to aid in the search and ask that the public stay away from the area during the search.

The man's name hasn't been released.

SCHOOL-STUDENT GUNS

GILLETTE, Wyo. (AP) — Attorneys for a boy charged with nine counts of attempted first-degree murder for bringing guns to a junior high school in Gillette are asking that his case be moved to juvenile court.

The boy, now 15, was charged as an adult and pleaded not guilty in March.

The Gillette News Record reports a hearing is set for Oct. 28-29 for his public defenders to lay out their case. They also want his $275,000 cash bail be reduced. Prosecutors oppose a reduction.

The boy has been jailed since Nov. 13, 2018, when he allegedly took two guns and 36 bullets to Sage Valley Junior High with plans to shoot nine teachers or students.

He showed another student one of the guns and that student told the principal.

His attorneys argue he was charged too harshly.

WYOMING-COAL COMMITTEE

CASPER, Wyo. (AP) — Wyoming lawmakers have voted to create a subcommittee to address the negative effects of bankruptcy filings by coal companies that do business across the state.

The Casper Star-Tribune reports the legislature's Management Council voted Thursday to create a subcommittee to focus on ensuring coal companies that file for bankruptcy continue to meet their obligations, such as employee health care benefits and money for reclamation work

The eight committee members are expected to be selected within the next 10 days. The committee is authorized to meet up to six times ahead of Wyoming's monthlong 2020 budget session, which begins in February.

The committee has authority to draft legislation but any bills it creates would require a two-thirds vote of the legislature to be introduced during a budget session.

SheridanWyoming.com

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