Wyoming News Update

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MOOSE-INTERSECTION

JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) — Cars and trucks are killing a lot of moose near an intersection in western Wyoming.

Recently vehicles killed two moose in a week near the intersection of Wyoming highways 22 and 390 a few miles (5 kilometers) west of Jackson.

The Jackson Hole News & Guide reports at least 116 moose have been hit and killed within two miles (3 kilometers) of the intersection since 1990.

The Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation says the pace of road kill is increasing.

Local officials say they plan improvements to make the roads less dangerous for wildlife. Some residents say for now, signs and lower speed limits could help prevent moose deaths.

FISHING LICENSE-DISABLED

CODY, Wyo. (AP) — A proposed rule change would allow disabled men and women who live in Wyoming to obtain free lifetime fishing licenses.

The proposal and others will go before the state Game and Fish Commission in July.

Only people deemed permanently and totally disabled by the U.S. Social Security Administration could qualify for the free fishing license and conservation stamp.

The Cody Enterprise reports the license and stamp would remain valid for as long as the person remained a Wyoming resident.

CASINO LAYOFFS

LANDER, Wyo. (AP) — Officials with the Eastern Shoshone Tribe say the Shoshone Rose Casino and Hotel in central Wyoming is making a number of changes, including employee layoffs, because of financial problems.

Tribal officials said the Lander casino will lay off 15 to 20 employees, end table games, discontinue shuttle buses, dissolve the banquet department and close the casino during the overnight hours Sunday through Thursday.

The Casper Star-Tribune reports that officials say the cutbacks are needed to ensure the casino's survival.

The changes were made after a gaming consultant was hired to review the casino's operations.

Tribal business council Chairman Vernon Hill said a news release that the process has been difficult but the council will do everything it can to bring the jobs back once operations are stabilized.

OIL PRODUCTION

LARAMIE, Wyo. (AP) — Oil production in Wyoming has hit its highest level in 25 years.

The Wyoming State Geological Survey notes that 599 new wells were drilled in the state last year and that one out of every five wells in the state was new.

Wyoming Public Radio reports that Campbell and Converse counties led the state with the most oil production.

Oil and gas geologist Rachel Toner says the rise in production is connected to the popularity of horizontal drilling, which can reach oil reservoirs that conventional wells miss.

Nearly half of the wells completed in 2018 were horizontal and located primarily in Campbell, Converse and Laramie counties.

Toner says wildcatters have begun to dot the state over the past decade with unconventional reservoirs as the main target.

YELLOWSTONE-MOUNT WASHBURN

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. (AP) — The Mount Washburn trail and trailhead parking area at Dunraven Pass in Yellowstone National Park will be closed in August as work continues to improve the trail.

The popular hiking trail is located north of Canyon Junction and is being improved for public safety reasons.

The National Park Service says the closure will occur Aug. 6-27 and a helicopter will be used to deliver materials to the work site.

The agency has been working recently on various improvements to the area, including new windows and concrete preservation work at the lookout.

The Mount Washburn Trail from Chittenden Road will remain open during the work.

WESTERN COLORADO-JOB CORPS

DENVER (AP) — A longstanding U.S. Forest Service job training center for rural youth in western Colorado will be taken over by a private contractor.

Colorado Public Radio reports the Collbran Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center has been told its 46 employees will lose their jobs at an undetermined date.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture also is closing several other Job Corps Civilian Conservation Centers nationwide, drawing protests from members of Congress, including Colorado's delegation.

Lawmakers say it's a bad idea to close the centers, especially in the West, where trainees help the Forest Service fight wildfires.

The Collbran center has operated for more than 50 years.

SheridanWyoming.com

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