Both seem to work. Which is better? (updated)

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On the left are 4-inch wide by 10-foot long yellow stripes that are 15-mils thick (.38mm) and separate two-way traffic traveling 65-mph on many of Wyoming's rural unlighted highways - on the right is a 33-inch wide, block long concrete median that is 8-inches high and separates two-way traffic traveling 30-mph on Sheridan's North Main Street under an abundance of street lights. Two 4" wide stripes (to indicate a no-passing zone) a mile long would require about 32 gals of paint - while a mile of concrete median requires about 360 yards of concrete. Since both methods seem to work, which is safer; more aesthetic, practical and cost effective? For more see: http://www.sheridanmedia.com/pol...

Update: In a phone call with Ronda Holwell, WYDOT Public Involvement Specialist, it was pointed out that you cannot compare rural and urban highways/streets as was inferred from this photo collage. It was also pointed out that you cannot draw identical comparisons between North Main Street (north of the bridge at Dow Street) with South Main (south of the bridge to Burkitt Street). North Main has both turn lanes and raised medians with a speed limit of 30-mph while South Main has no turn lanes or raised medians (just double yellow lines) and a speed limit of 20-mph. South Main has only about 4 locations where it is possible to turn across traffic at other than an intersection, i.e. into the alleyway adjacent to the Fly Shop of the Bighorns and into the alleyway adjacent to the Mint Bar to mention two. While on North Main, were it not for the turn lanes or raised concrete medians, it would be possible to turn across traffic into numerous residential driveways and businesses.

On the left are 4-inch wide by 10-foot long yellow stripes that are 15-mils thick (.38mm) and separate two-way traffic traveling 65-mph on many of Wyoming's rural unlighted highways - on the right is a 33-inch wide, block long concrete median that is 8-inches high and separates two-way traffic traveling 30-mph on Sheridan's North Main Street under an abundance of street lights.
On the left are 4-inch wide by 10-foot long yellow stripes that are 15-mils thick (.38mm) and separate two-way traffic traveling 65-mph on many of Wyoming's rural unlighted highways - on the right is a 33-inch wide, block long concrete median that is 8-inches high and separates two-way traffic traveling 30-mph on Sheridan's North Main Street under an abundance of street lights.