Wolves: It's All a Matter of Perspective

(Judy Hagerott photo)
(Judy Hagerott photo)

Called the “terrorist of the timber” or the “icon of the wild” or even the “shark of the plains,” when the name wolf is mentioned, different images are conjured up for different folk.

Attitudes about wolves all depends on your interaction with them says Cat Urbigkit (ur-big-kite) in her presentation “Public Attitudes About Wolves,” held at the Inner Circle of Fulmer Public Library Sunday.

Urbigkit knows wolves living on a sheep ranch 200 miles south of Yellowstone where Canadian wolves have been reintroduced and are doing well. It's all a matter of perspective when it comes to wolves.

There's much more to the story than a cow being killed as Urbigkit explains.

Rita Donham also works in Sublette County and believes the wolf needs a little education.

A scientific experiment, a tourist attraction, or a livestock menace, the wolf continues to be controversial, especially in the delisting process.

The Health Nut
view counter
SheridanWyoming.com