A 'Tongue in Cheek' Look at the Stroll

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Kerry Eblen, part of a bell choir at the Christmas Stroll.
Kerry Eblen, part of a bell choir at the Christmas Stroll.

It's a long-held tradition for folks to head downtown the night after Thanksgiving to take part in the annual Sheridan Christmas Stroll.

It was just my husband and me -- our teen-age kids don't like to hang with us anymore, preferring their friends nowadays.

Yes, we had our stroll button in hand, but why is it that when you go into a store you can't ever find the store's prize winning number? It's like an intentional hide-and-seek game. My husband says it's like having to go to the back of the store to pick up a gallon of milk.

That's not bad, but with all the folks in there looking for the same number you're looking for, it sure lends to a lot of shoulder bumping just to get through. But isn't that what the stroll is all about?...rubbing shoulders with old friends.

This was Shrenda Byrd's first stroll and she was excited to meet up with her old friends.

Did I hear right? Was she calling me an old face?

Now, Main Street was blocked off so folks could stroll without fear of getting run over, unless you're talking about the two trolley cars running up and down Main. Being all bundled up, you just can't hear them coming.

Jay Bridger was one of the drivers and he shared his expertise.

Trolley cars, a miniature train, and for the little people, another ride lit up their eyes. Just ask five year-old Daniela Gooch.

Horsies pulling wagons. Now that's a western tradition.

There were all sorts of folks out. A trio of nuns strolled by, but upon closer look, one of them was a guy. A guy nun? It was Mark Rogacaewski advertising for Holy Name School's upcoming fundraiser called “The Mystery of the Magi's Gold.” He said he could have done a little fundraising for himself at the Stroll.

There were teenagers everywhere, but sometimes teens just make you shake your head in wonder. Hanna Will was walking down Main, no coat, no hat, all in the freezing weather, but this was her philosophy.

It didn't work; it still was cold out. We walked into a furniture store and found a bunch of young people sitting on the couches in there. Katelynn Bulkley explained what they were doing.

Is that an oxymoron or what?..."chillin' but trying to stay warm."

All in all, it was still a great night to be out, cold or not. So many handshakes, hearty hello's and hugs, even for this old face. But what we heard echoed down Main, folks saying throughout the night, was that cherished old phrase, "Merry Christmas." Merry Christmas to you and yours.

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