Scars Remain, Wildflowers Abound

The scars from last year's Gilead Fire are still visible from the Rock Creek Recommended Wilderness Area north of Buffalo. (Photos by Chris Foy)
The scars from last year's Gilead Fire are still visible from the Rock Creek Recommended Wilderness Area north of Buffalo. (Photos by Chris Foy)

The scars from last year's Gilead Fire are still visible at the Rock Creek Recommended Wilderness Area a few miles north of Buffalo. But adjacent to the dozer lines are dozens and dozens of wildflowers that have since spawned and matured.

On Sunday, the Wyoming Wilderness Association took a group of hikers up to the top of the recommended wilderness to view the regenerative effects fire has - and had - on the native wildlife and the nearby area. Though the areas that were actually burned in the blaze are still black with soot, everything from wildflowers to antelope and fungi to pine trees depend on the occasional fire.

Forester Tony Saba and Sheridan College's Amy Erickson took turns educating the group, pointing out different lifeforms that couldn't exist without the occasional fire. Saba even says when he prescribes burns, he mimics nature.

Two young high schoolers were part of Sunday's group. What did they think of it? First up is Maria Stacy.

Now, Lyndon Bare.

But both said they learned a lot about regeneration while enjoying the beautiful vistas and the climb up to the top. Bare shares what she learned.

There are still more free hikes available through the Wyoming Wilderness Association. For a full schedule, click the attachment below.

Wyo Theater
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