New Insignia for Wyoming's Training Center Command Soldiers

Sgt. Earl McCoy, of Guernsey, Wyo., assigned to the Wyoming Army National Guard’s Training Center Command at Camp Guernsey, displays the unit’s new shoulder sleeve insignia on his uniform. The insignia was changed in recognition of the state and national mission the soldiers have in assisting units preparing for federal and state missions.  (Photo courtesy of 1st Lt. Christian Venhuizen/Wyoming National Guard))
Sgt. Earl McCoy, of Guernsey, Wyo., assigned to the Wyoming Army National Guard’s Training Center Command at Camp Guernsey, displays the unit’s new shoulder sleeve insignia on his uniform. The insignia was changed in recognition of the state and national mission the soldiers have in assisting units preparing for federal and state missions. (Photo courtesy of 1st Lt. Christian Venhuizen/Wyoming National Guard))

The days of the galloping horse-and-rider patch, worn by members of Wyoming's Training Center Command, are over. The yellow and light blue colors of the "Pony Express" insignia reference the 1803 Louisiana Purchase, which incorporated most of Wyoming into the Union.

The new patch worn by service members at Camp Guernsey - Wyoming's Joint Training and Command Center - features a statue of a Minuteman surrounded by 13 stars. Some training centers have declined to replace their old patches with the new insignia.

While the galloping horse-and-rider no longer represents Camp Guernsey, it's still affixed to the sleeves of the soldiers assigned to units at the Wyoming Army National Guard’s Joint Forces Headquarters and 94th Troop Command.

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