First Person: Surviving Little Rock Tornado

This tornado hit Little Rock Arkansas on Monday, April 25th at 6 pm.  It was taken from a downtown hospital.  In reality, the color is an eerie army green because of the hail within the clouds.
This tornado hit Little Rock Arkansas on Monday, April 25th at 6 pm. It was taken from a downtown hospital. In reality, the color is an eerie army green because of the hail within the clouds.

For the past month, tornadoes have been ravaging multiple states in the Midwestern, southern and southeastern part of the country.

As of this report, well over 200 people have lost their lives, most after the worst tornado cluster to hit the country since the early 1970's covered thousands of miles last night.

On Monday, April 25th, Little Rock, Arkansas and surrounding communities were hit by several twisters, one touching down just miles from Beth (Frey) Curry's home. Curry, a 1983 Sheridan High School graduate, has lived in Little Rock for 22 years. She talks about this experience with Sheridan Media's Mary Jo Johnson.

Truly, she says, she's never seen storms like the ones that have bombarded the area.

The Currys have two daughters, ages 13 and 8, as well as a family pet. Beth says that while they were scared, the were prepared.

The bedroom community of Vilonia, Arkansas was hit hardest by that particular storm. Curry says that officials categorized that tornado as a Class 2, which decimated homes and took the lives of about ten people. It also caused a fair amount of damage to the air force base located there.

So might her family choose a different “safe place” besides that hallway closet?

The picture to which she refers is the one accompanying this story. It was taken at 6 pm Monday, and she said it was an eerie, army-green color.

Other storms also affected Lake Ouachita in Hot Springs, Arkansas, where the Currys spend a lot of time recreating in the summer. She says the lake rose six feet because of the heavy rains.

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