Employers Say They Need a Skilled Workforce to Fulfill High Demand

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Sheridan College sophomore, Tillie Hoefer, works on a project with a manual mill machine. She's set to graduate with an Associate of Applied Science degree in Machine Tool Technology in May. (Photo courtesy of Wendy Smith with Sheridan College)
Sheridan College sophomore, Tillie Hoefer, works on a project with a manual mill machine. She's set to graduate with an Associate of Applied Science degree in Machine Tool Technology in May. (Photo courtesy of Wendy Smith with Sheridan College)

We previously reported that Whitney Benefits is partnering with Sheridan College to create the new Jobs, Education and Technology program. Sheridan Media's Chris Foy has the latest.


The Jobs, Education and Technology program at Sheridan College is designed to expand the college's offerings to fill the high demand locally for employees in areas like machine tool, diesel and welding technology and agriculture and horticulture.

Sheridan Mayor Dave Kinskey says there's no shortage of these types of jobs in Sheridan, there's a shortage of trained workers. Kinskey comments on what he's noticed after he took Superintendent of Public Instruction, Cindy Hill, on a tour of Sheridan's homegrown industries.

His invitation to the legislators was first accepted by Hill, and he explains she saw some local businesses with international customers.

Kinskey says it's not just Sheridan College who's trying to beef up the trained workforce. He's hearing it straight from employers.

Just last week, Whitney Benefits announced they're asking for community members to match their pledge of $1 million to aid their efforts at increasing the amount of skilled workers to fill high-demand jobs here in Sheridan.

Editor's note: Sheridan Media's Ron Richter contributed to this report.

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