AP News Update

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AP News Update

Latest Wyoming news, sports, business and entertainment

FLOOD OUTLOOK

Big snowpack means potential flooding in Wyoming

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) - The National Weather Service says the above-average snow Wyoming received this winter means increased potential for flooding along some main river basins when the mountain snowpack starts to melt.

Statewide, the mountain snowpack in Wyoming is 135 percent of median this week, with some areas 160 percent of median.

Riverton National Weather Service hydrologist Jim Fahey says there was moderate to high potential for flooding from snowmelt around the Big Horn Mountains in north-central Wyoming, the Saratoga and Encampment area in south-central Wyoming, along the Wind River in central Wyoming and in the Upper Green region in southwest Wyoming.

Fahey says the snow has melted in most low-lying areas. But the snowpack high in the mountains doesn't typically start to melt in earnest until the latter part of May.

Fahey cautions that the flood forecast only accounts for mountain runoff from the current snowpack and various other hydrological factors that now exist.

A heavy rain on top of the snowmelt already heading down a mountain can result in minor flooding turning into major flooding.

EATON EXECUTION

Psychologist: Eaton not intellectually disabled

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) - A psychologist has determined Wyoming's lone death row inmate doesn't qualify as intellectually disabled, a finding that closes what could have been a potential avenue for additional appeals.

69-year-old inmate Dale Wayne Eaton was sentenced to death in 2004 in state court for the 1988 rape and murder of 18-year-old Lisa Marie Kimmell of Billings, Mont. Eaton's lawyers don't dispute he killed Kimmell.

She disappeared in 1988 while driving across Wyoming. Her body was found later in the North Platte River. Investigators linked Eaton to her killing through DNA evidence while he was serving prison time on an unrelated offense. Investigators later dug up her car on his property west of Casper.

Eaton's fate now hangs on a federal court proceeding in Cheyenne, where his lawyers are arguing that his state team failed to present an adequate defense.

Eaton's lawyers have tried to establish that his trial team failed to show jurors details about how his tortured family history, childhood and long-term mental and emotional problems. They say the jury might have spared his life if they knew more about him.

CASPER POLICE SHOOTING

Casper police wound suicidal man

CASPER, Wyo. (AP) - Casper police say officers wounded a suicidal man in an exchange of gunfire.

Lt. Steve Freel says the man was injured but was expected to survive. No officers were injured.

The name of the man and the extent of his injuries were not released.

Freel says the incident occurred about 10 p.m. Monday after Casper police responded to a call reporting a suicidal man.

He says the man was struck by at least one bullet fired by an officer.

Police did not specify who fired first.

COLD CASE SLAYINGS

Decades-old Wyoming murder case heads to trial

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) - Prosecutors and defense attorneys began to question dozens of prospective jurors as the second of two decades-old murder cases involving an elderly Missouri couple headed to trial.

Investigators haven't linked the mid-1970s and 1980 crimes allegedly committed by 75-year-old Alice Uden and 71-year-old Gerald Uden, but that's only heightened widespread interest in the pair from rural Chadwick, Mo., since their arrest in September.

Prosecutors allege Alice Uden shot Ronald Holtz with a .22-caliber rifle as he slept sometime between Christmas Eve 1974, and Feb. 5, 1975. She had been married to the 25-year-old Holtz for only a month or two.

Arrested around the same time as Alice Uden last fall was her current husband, Gerald Uden, who pleaded guilty Nov. 1 in another case.

Uden told a courtroom in Lander he shot his ex-wife and her two sons with before dumping their bodies in Fremont Lake north of Pinedale in western Wyoming. Investigators spent a couple of days searching the 600-foot-deep lake last fall before calling off the search for the winter.

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