“Cuttiethon” Documentary by Former Sheridanite

A self portrait with [Sexton's] biggest landed fish of the Cuttie-thon. I lost others that were HUGE. But, I think that’s how it works. I caught this 16-inch specimen on a #16 Parachute Adams. (photo used by permission of Zac Sexton)
A self portrait with [Sexton's] biggest landed fish of the Cuttie-thon. I lost others that were HUGE. But, I think that’s how it works. I caught this 16-inch specimen on a #16 Parachute Adams. (photo used by permission of Zac Sexton)

Since graduating from Sheridan High School in 1999, former Sheridan resident Justin Stroup has done everything from traveling European countries alone, to learning improv at Chicago's famed Second City.

He's studied international business at the University of Wyoming, and taught English as a second language in South Korea for a year.

Interested in a wide array of people and places perhaps led him to his career choice of making documentary films.

In the summer of 2009, Justin partnered with a young man he met through a mutual friend to film what has become known as “Cuttiethon.” Justin explains what he filmed.

Stroup narrowed down nine hours of film into 20-minute piece. He then stepped away from it for several months, and looking at it with fresh eyes, whittled it down to just under fifteen minutes, which qualified it for submission into the Wyoming Short Film competition.

With a guitar music underscore by his brother, Colin Stroup, Justin says it is truly an all-Wyoming film. He briefs us on a bit of the coverage.

Stroup says that he will be helping Zac with a project in the Northwest that is being done for ComCast. Meantime, he is also working on a documentary about illegal immigrants, as he makes his home in Tucson, Arizona.

To view Justin's documentary short film and then cast your vote of support, click here: http://www.wyomingshortfilmconte...

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