Dayton

The cost of fighting the Sheep Creek Fire burning through a protected wildlife habitat area of the Bighorn National Forest in the Big Horn Mountains above Dayton will be shared by federal, state and county agencies.

The Sheep Creek Fire burning four miles from Dayton isn't yet a threat to the town of around 800 people, according to Mayor Norm Anderson. In an interview with Sheridan Media, the mayor recalled a more disastrous fire a few years ago.

Dayton Mayor Norm Anderson says officials and residents are vigilant about the fire that's burning within four miles of the town, but at this time, they're in no danger.

Filing is now open for elections in five Sheridan County Fire Districts.

More than 100 firefighters continue to battle the wildfire that has burned through 1,000 acres of timber and grassland in the mountains above the town of Dayton.

UPDATE Aug. 5 1:30 p.m. – More accurate mapping reveals the Sheep Creek Fire is smaller than originally estimated.

Wildlife officials have now announced the closure of the Amsden Creek Habitat Area threatened by the Sheep Creek Fire burning in the Bighorn National Forest in the Big Horn Mountains above Dayton.

Teams of fire-fighting crews from across the state are in the Dayton area, northeast of Sheridan, working on the Sheep Creek Fire burning since Sunday in the Bighorn National Forest up a canyon, about four miles from Dayton, a town of about 800 people.

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