Commentary

No, I am not running for any political office, but lately we have been all over Wyoming and what we have seen is very impressive.

In Gillette for a state tourism summit, we heard Mary Silvernell of the Campbell County Lodging Board say that lodging tax receipts are at “an all-time high.” It is not tourists who are filling all those hotel rooms, but workers in the oil and gas industry.

We joined folks from Laramie, Green River, Lusk, Rawlins, Saratoga, Encampment, Medicine Bow, Chicago and Sun Valley at an event at an even more obscure place in Wyoming recently.

For years, the giant billboard showing cars working their way down a street through a Wyoming cattle drive was stationed on the busiest highway in New York City.  It was figured that this image was seen by millions of frustrated and stranded city-dwellers stuck in stalled traffic.

Wyoming has rarely gotten the reputation as a wet place. Perhaps except only when ski areas get buried or back when Cheyenne was inundated by a horrific super cell thunderstorm, our state is generally known as semi-arid.

By Gregory Nickerson - Wyoming voters will have four choices for the U.S. Senate seat that is up for election this November, in a race where the 18-year incumbent Sen. Mike Enzi (R) has all the advantages of name recognition and a well-funded campaign.

As the leaves turn and the mercury plummets and occasional snow threatens our young trees, it gives a man pause. It is appropriate to recall those two most important questions that pop up this time of year:

Wyoming governors historically love hosting the One Shot Antelope Hunt in Lander. Gov. Matt Mead is no exception and will be hosting his fourth hunt on Sept. 20.

WyoFile.com - Wyoming journalist and WyoFile contributor Rone Tempest has filed a complaint against the U.S. Department of Energy

Syndicate content