Commentary

My first chance to watch the late Clay James in action was when he was helping to preserve world peace from Jackson Hole, Wyoming, in 1989.

In Wyoming, we love our small towns. From Powell to Wheatland, from Pinedale to Pine Bluffs or from Kemmerer to Sundance, and all places in-between, folks in the Cowboy state love their hometowns.

In the past year, two odd stories have occurred, concerning women here in Wyoming that made national news. Both women were matriarchs of their families.

We had so many record rains this past spring that I thought Wyoming could not get more beautiful that it looked in May and June. Everywhere we went we saw green, green, green.

In the past six months, the energy economy in Wyoming has taken some serious hits leaving folks from Gillette to Rock Springs and Cheyenne to Cody nervous and pessimistic.

It might have been former U. S. Sen. Al Simpson who said all politics in Wyoming is personal.  I would expand on that by claiming Wyoming is such a small state “everything is personal.”

Gov. Matt Mead likes to stop by our coffee group, the Fox News All-Stars, when he gets to Lander.

During the annual One Shot Antelope Hunt festivities, he showed up on a Friday morning.

It was always my intention to cause Wyoming’s 180 million year history to come alive in my newest coffee table book about the state.  Called Wyoming at 125, Our Place in the West, we have attempted to show what Wyoming looked like over its long history.

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