Commentary

From land and from the air, the outline of Devils Tower can be seen from a long way off.

In the early 1980s, I owned a newspaper in Spearfish, S. D., and flew a private plane across Wyoming taking care of business there.

It is almost stunning to see how healthy Dick Cheney looks the first time you see him with his new heart.

For decades, Wyoming has basked in the glory of being the country’s “energy breadbasket.”    

One of Wyoming’s retired Speakers of the House said the following:

Wyoming has had some great slogans and logos over the years.  Its image of the bucking horse is one of best-known logos in the country.

Is this hell?

Or is it Yellowstone?

That was my exact thought as I piloted a small, single engine airplane over the vast expanse of Yellowstone National Park in August of 1988, during the horrible fires that year.

Newcomers might find this hard to believe, but a common form of measurement a few decades ago, when it came to traveling Wyoming’s long distances, was: “How many beers does it take to get there?”

This week marks the 76th memorial anniversary of the worst forest fire disaster in Wyoming history when it came to loss of firefighter lives.

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