Commentary

Way back in December 1999 I wrote a column, which detailed the achilles heel of Wyoming's economic expansion - the lack of qualified workers who live here.

Besides ending the Civil War, freeing the slaves and launching a national railway, President Abraham Lincoln also thought it important to have a designated highway crossing the country from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean.

By definition, the term “bucket list” stands for those places you want to visit or those things you want to do before you die.

For some time now, I have been publishing my own version of this list and have gradually been checking a few off my list.

Should women work in coal mines?
Should there be a severance tax on coal?
Should you be literate in order to vote?
Should women be allowed to vote?
Should the state own rights to all the water?
How many people do you need to become a state?

Mother Nature can take on some ornery appearances across America this time of year – even here in Wyoming.

Although tornadoes are rare in the Cowboy State, dust devils and waterspouts are quite common.

This is the time of year when our Wyoming political world truly becomes the crazy season.

Between parades, celebrations and backyard meet-and-greets, the folks competing for political office find themselves on the dead run.

During a recent road trip through nine states, I stumbled on to an interesting factoid: the longest highway in America bisects Wyoming.

True recollections of Wyoming history involving such things as wolf roundups and recollections of historical figures like Gen. George Armstrong Custer and Sacajawea come alive in a uniquely historical book, whose story of how it came into being is almost as interesting as the stories it tells.

Syndicate content