Commentary

Mummies are common in the ancient world but were there ever mummies in Wyoming?

In at least three cases the answer to that question is yes.

It is highly possible that there is a small spot in Wyoming which once was bordered by four different territories, parts of which together became the future home of our great state.

When I was in high school, it was easy to impress me. It did not take much for a teacher, parent, sibling, friend or newsmaker to convince me about certain facts in the world.

It is hard to find any evidence of some mysterious serial killings that allegedly occurred in Wyoming 147 years ago.

According to a couple of books, a notorious family named Bartlett killed 22 young men before being hunted down and killed back in historic South Pass City.

My favorite all-time tourism slogan for our state was the short-lived BIG WYOMING, which described our towering mountains, vast high plains, amazing deserts and long distances.

Most everyone in Wyoming and across the nation knows about the two biggest “firsts” that occurred here – Yellowstone National Park being the first national park in the world in 1872 and the granting of women the right to vote in 1869 in Wyoming territory.

Wyoming is such a special place. At least it certainly is to me.

Yet I often get into an argument with various folks when I put our “low-population, high-empty space place” on a pedestal. This happened two weeks ago when my column talked about Wyoming exceptionalism, through our Universal Truths and Fundamental Values.

Ah, springtime in Wyoming; you gotta love it.

In recent weeks, we have dodged storms in Cheyenne, Laramie and Rawlins and endured them in Lander and Jackson.
One day, you can be wearing shorts and a tee shirt, the next you are bundled up against a harsh wind and heavy wet snow.

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