Commentary

Morning people have always impressed me. For some time now, it has been my desire to reinvent myself as a lark, rather than an owl. These two birds pretty much represent those two unique kinds of people – the morning person and the night owl.

If you like tourism like I do, then it is easy to appreciate what Yellowstone National Park means to Wyoming.

Some three million folks come to the world’s first national park each year. Almost a third of them are international tourists.

World War II was an extraordinary time in Wyoming with over 10 percent of the state’s population involved in fighting that war. Over 1,000 died.

This summer I will attend my 50th high school graduation reunion. As someone that old, what on earth could I possibly tell a crowd of Wyoming high school or college graduates during their important time?

Some day little Theresa Freeh will realize what a special little girl she was on that Wednesday when Pope Francis kissed her.

She was among 800,000 people crowding the Vatican in the center of Rome during the sainthood ceremonies recently where two former popes were canonized.

At a recent meeting of the Lander Planning Commission, of which I have been a member for years, it was mentioned that we would soon be deciding on the addition of yet another “storage” facility on the east edge of our town.

Wyoming folks are not shy about talking about their favorite places in our home state.

And I am going to take that habit to an extreme in my next book, which will include photos and stories of 101 of Wyoming’s favorite places.

This is one of my favorite Wyoming stories and it includes an interesting twist at the end.

Yellowstone National Park is just about my single most favorite place on the planet. It is this vast two million acre park full of wonderful creatures and amazing sites.

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